Guidelines and reports

Results 147

Guidelines and reports

Making the case for inclusive quality physical education policy development: a policy brief

UNESCO

Sustainable development starts with active, healthy and physically engaged citizens. The importance of good health and the inadequacies of existing health infrastructures have been brought into sharp focus during the COVID pandemic. Addressing health gaps will be critical to recovery efforts. Schools are a natural entry-point to trigger transformative behavioural shifts related to healthy lifestyles.

As such, investment in an innovative and integrated delivery of education, exercise and good nutrition should be considered as a key component of recovery efforts.

It is well known that individual engagement in targeted, values-based interventions in sport, physical education and physical activity increases physical and mental health. Engagement in active, values-infused learning environments, like quality physical education classes, also boosts intellectual, individual and emotional capital.

This translates to an acceleration of socio-emotional skills acquisition that grow the confidence of students and, in turn, build the psycho-social resilience necessary to respond creatively and effectively to future crises whether related to health, employment or inclusion.

Gender EqualityGood HealthPartnerships for the GoalsQuality Education
Guidelines and reports

How to influence the development of quality physical education policy: a policy advocacy toolkit for youth

UNESCO

This toolkit is designed to support young people advocate for and effectively contribute to the development of quality physical education (QPE) policy. Youth organizations and other civil society actors who work in youth engagement and/or education, physical activity and sport and who are not familiar with policy advocacy may also find the content useful.

This toolkit offers general principles for successful policy advocacy that can be adapted based on what best suits your national context and specific policy development processes. You will find sections presenting the value of youth engagement in policy development, tried and tested techniques to inspire impact-oriented advocacy strategies and practical checklists to navigate physical education (PE) policy development processes.

The content of the toolkit is particularly relevant for sport and QPE policy advocacy as it contains specific data on the benefits of investing, subject-specific resources and concrete examples from the QPE policy revision project. The ideas and strategies outlined can also be used to support youth engagement in the development of overlapping policy frameworks e.g. health, education, gender equality.

Toolkit users are encouraged to take an inter-sectoral and intersectional approach to PE policy advocacy. Coalition-building across sport, education and health sectors will help pool limited capacities and ensure a coherent national vision in terms of policy design, commitments and budgeting. Inter-sectoral coherence will also maximize impact at the local and national levels.

The toolkit draws directly on the findings of UNESCO’s Quality Physical Education Policy Project. You can learn more about the project on the dedicated webpage.

Youth were key stakeholders in the national policy revision exercises carried out within the framework of the QPE Policy Project. The project evaluation highlighted the key contributions of inter-sectoral partnerships and participatory policy development processes in the elaboration of robust, inclusive and impact-oriented policy documents.

Gender EqualityGood HealthPartnerships for the GoalsQuality Education
Guidelines and reports

Carbon Calculator

Carbon Footprint

The online carbon footprint calculation tools enable you to calculate your personal or business carbon footprint.

The Carbon Calculator follow the methodology outlined by the UK Government, and currently using the "Greenhouse gas reporting: conversion factors 2020".

The calculator uses emissions factors which take account of all greenhouse gases (i.e. CO2, N2O, methane etc.) released by the activities, with the results presented in units of metric tonnes of CO2 equivalent (CO2e).

In most cases that means the results will be slightly higher than if calculating CO2 only. The calculations of emissions from fuels are Scope 1, meaning the direct GHG emissions from the combustion of the fuels.
The calculations do not include the Well to Tank (WTT) Scope 3 Emissions associated with extraction, refining, distribution, storage and retail of the fuels.

The following elements can be measured in the calculator:

  • House/Buildings
  • Flights
  • Car/Motorbike
  • Bus/Rail
  • Secondary Footprint (this is a measure of the emissions caused through the manufacture, delivery and disposal of products and services we buy. Most carbon footprint calculators ignore this part of your footprint, but without it you may risk under estimating your total footprint quite considerably).

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

WFLDB

Quantis

The World Food LCA Database (WFLDB) is a comprehensive international life cycle inventory database and a global initiative led by Quantis in partnership with leaders in the agri-food sector.

WFLDB was launched in 2012 in response to the growing need for reliable, transparent and coherent environmental data and a consistent methodology for assessing the impacts of agri-food products.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

ICAO Carbon Emissions Calculator

ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organisation)

The International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) is funded and directed by 193 national governments to support their diplomacy and cooperation in air transport as signatory states to the Chicago Convention (1944).

ICAO has developed a methodology to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions from air travel for use in offset programmes.

The ICAO Carbon Emissions Calculator allows passengers to estimate the emissions attributed to their air travel. It is simple to use and requires only a limited amount of information from the user.

Summary of the methodology used:
CO2 Emissions per passenger take into consideration the load factor and are based only on passenger operations (i.e. fuel burn associated with belly freight is not considered). The steps for the estimation of CO2 emissions per passenger:

  • Step 1: Estimation of the aircraft fuel burn
  • Step 2: Calculation of the passengers' fuel burn based on a passenger/freight factor which is derived from RTK data
  • Step 3: Calculation of seats occupied (assumption: all aircraft are entirely configured with economic seats). Seat occupied = Total seats * Load Factor
  • Step 4: CO2 emissions per passenger = (Passengers' fuel burn * 3.16) / Seat occupied

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

IDEA Database

IDEA (Inventory Database for Environmental Analysis)

One of the major features of IDEA is that it covers all business economic activities in Japan. The number of datasets contained in this database is now 3,825 in total.

IDEA contains LCI datasets of non-manufacturing sectors (agriculture, forestry and fisheries, mining, construction and civil engineering) as well as manufacturing sectors (food and beverage, textile, chemical industry, ceramics and building materials, metal and machinery) and also sectors such as electricity, gas, water and sewerage. It covers all products that are classified within the scope of the Japan Standard Commodity Classification, so the comprehensiveness is guaranteed.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

GaBi Database

Sphera

Sphera’s Life Cycle Assessment Database and software (GaBi Software) combines the world’s leading Life Cycle Engineering modeling and reporting software and content databases with intuitive data collection and reporting tools. Sphera enables Life Cycle Engineering professionals to affect business results by helping to save money, reduce risk, communicate product benefits and increase revenue.

Database is upgraded annually and includes over 9,000 profiles of accurate and relevant data.

GaBi databases include the complete ELCD database, US LCI, data from trade associations and Ecoinvent.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

US Life Cycle Inventory

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory

The The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners created the U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (USLCI) Database to help life cycle assessment practitioners answer questions about environmental impact.

The USLCI database provides individual gate-to-gate, cradle-to-gate, and cradle-to-grave accounting of the energy and material flows into and out of the environment that are associated with producing a material, component, or assembly in the U.S.

The U.S. Life Cycle Inventory (USLCI) Database is a publicly available database that allows users to objectively review and compare analysis results that are based on similar data collection and analysis methods.

Finding consistent and transparent life cycle inventory data for life cycle assessments is difficult. NREL works with life cycle assessment experts to develop a consistent and transparent life cycle inventory data for life cycle assessment, by providing a central source of critically reviewed life cycle inventory data through its USLCI Database Project. NREL's USLCI management team worked closely with government stakeholders, and industry partners to develop the database.

The USLCI Database Project was initiated on May 1, 2001, and gained national prominence at a meeting of interests hosted by the Ford Motor Company. Funding agencies and representatives of industrial, academic, and consulting communities voiced strong support for the project. As a result, an advisory group with 45 representatives from manufacturing, government, and non-government organizations, as well as life cycle assessment experts, worked together to create the U.S. LCI Database Project Development

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Ecoinvent Database

Ecoinvent

Ecoinvent is one of the world's most consistent & transparent life cycle inventory database.
Ecoinvent is a not-for-profit association founded by Swiss Federal Institutes of Technology (eg. ETH Zurich, EPF Lausanne) and by Agroscope (Swiss Institute for Sustainability Science).

With more than 1,000 updated datasets,the ecoinvent Database is trusted by more than 3'000 organisations worldwide, ranging from multinational corporations to leading universities.

Ecoinvent Database is recommended by the International Olympic Committee.

The access to Ecoinvent database and a set of reports is free of charge. The acess to the latest report and supporting documents for enhanced analytic functions requires a licence.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

World Athletics makes commitment to a cleaner, greener, more equitable world

World Athletics

World Athletics (WA) is the global governing body for the sport of Athletics. Today World Athletics encompasses track and field, race walking, road running, cross-country, mountain and trail running. Boasting 214 national Member Federations, World Athletics has significant global reach, and is responsible for the worldwide development of the sport of athletics. World Athletics is committed to ensuring that its athletics events, which are held all over the world, and its headquarters, based in Monaco, are fully aligned to the principles of sustainability. This is in recognition of the growing environmental challenges that the world faces today, specifically air pollution, climate change and our overconsumption of resources. Those, coupled with a lack of global equality and diversity, create an environmental and social impact that poses a serious threat to the quality of our lives and communities. Sustainability within athletics is defined as driving the practices and behaviours of all individuals and organisations developing the sport in such a way that it:

  • accounts for the needs of future generations;
  • provides a fair and level sporting platform based on sound ethical principles;
  • actively involves interested parties and is open about decisions and activities; and
  • ensures actions take a balanced approach to their social, economic and environmental impact
In April 2020, World Athletics announced its Sustainability Strategy, whose central goal is to make the organisation carbon neutral by 2030. The ten-year strategy is designed to deliver tangible benefits across the three pillars of sustainability - environmental, social and economic - by using the power of sport and athletics to create a better world for communities. The strategy includes a broad commitment to embrace sustainability principles and practices within its operations, its Member Federations and the organisation of future World Athletics Series events. The key benefits of the strategy include:
  • better management of the sport’s social and environmental risk factors;
  • identification of opportunities benefitting the sport and engaging a wider group of stakeholders;
  • more efficient use of resources delivering lower operating costs enabling greater investment in the sport; and
  • wider activation platform for partnerships to bringing significant economic, social and environmental benefits to local communities.
Components of the Sustainability Strategy include a plan to reduce World Athletics’ carbon output by 10 percent each year, a switch to 100 percent renewable energy at its headquarters by the end of 2020, the introduction of a sustainable procurement code and travel policy and to develop best practice guides for its 214 Member Federations and its event organisers. The strategy is divided into six pillars, each of which contain actions and targets for the organisation to pursue:
  • leadership in sustainability;
  • sustainable production and consumption;
  • climate change and carbon;
  • local environment and air quality;
  • global equality; and
  • diversity, accessibility and wellbeing.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife on LandPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

International Rafting Federation – Sustainability ideas for rafting event organisers

IRF (International Rafting Federation)

This guide is a continually growing list of practical ideas for event organisers to take on.

Climate ActionResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

International Rafting Federation – Sustainability ideas for operators, instructors, guides and recreational rafters

IRF (International Rafting Federation)

This guide includes a continually growing list of practical ideas to be taken on operators, instructors, guides and recreational rafters.

Climate ActionResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

International Rafting Federation – Practical Guide to Sustainability

IRF (International Rafting Federation)

In January 2021, the international Rafting Federation launched a series of practical guides to help rafters across the globe undertake a more sustainable approach to rafting.

The first guide is a “living” document which will be evaluated and revised on a regular basis, in response to changes in technology and the understanding of the significance of environmental sustainability in the sphere of rafting.

Content include:

A. Our commitment to Sustainability
B. Sustainability in all Rafting
C. Sustainability in Recreational Rafting, Racing and Guiding
D. Sustainability in Rafting Events
E. As an Athlete - what can I do?
F. Notes
G. Resources

Climate ActionResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

The football executive’s guide to sustainability strategy

The Sustainability Report

The Sustainability Report publishes our first white paper in collaboration with Touchline to explore the elements of a good sustainability strategy for football clubs, leagues and tournaments

Like so many sectors, the football industry was devastatingly exposed by the coronavirus pandemic. While most of the top European leagues and tournaments managed to navigate towards a conclusion, there was a peculiar and disconcerting feeling to it all.

And while many in the game will be hopeful that solutions will be found to the public health crisis and, in the short-term, bringing people back into stadiums safely, what’s happening now could be the tip of the iceberg.

Climate change and its impacts have the potential to impact football – both grassroots and professional – in an even more negative and profound way. A piece of research conducted by renowned journalist David Goldblatt and the Rapid Transition Alliance found that, in England alone, a quarter of its 92 professional league clubs could be affected by flooding every season.

Sustainability is a growing topic of interest within the world of football, but being sustainable is not just about managing risks like climate change – it’s about building a vision that captures value. It’s about strengthening relationships with fans. Becoming more efficient. And improving your brand and reputation.

Together with Touchline – our parent company and agency that specialises in sport, sustainability and reporting – we’ve put together ‘The football executive’s guide to sustainability strategy’ to help those in the football industry who want to get started with sustainability, but don’t know where to begin.

The guide explores how a football organisation can capture value through sustainability, and also how you can build your vision and align sustainability objectives with stakeholder priorities and international standards. We’ve reflected on some of the latest research in this area, and captured the experiences of some of the most renowned sustainability professionals in football, including:

– Patrick Gasser, UEFA’s head of football and social responsibility

– Bodour Al Meer, environment and sustainability senior manager for the Supreme Committee of Delivery and Legacy (Qatar 2022)

– Orjan Lundberg, sustainability expert for the Supreme Committee of Delivery and Legacy (Qatar 2022)

– Nico Briskorn, VfL Wolsburg’s head of corporate responsibility

– Andrea Maschietto, Juventus’ sustainability and external relations manager

Get your guide here.

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

IBU Sustainability Policy

IBU (International Biathlon Union)

The International Biathlon Union (IBU) launched its Sustainability Policy on October 12, 2020. This Policy provides the roadmap for the federation’s ten-year Sustainability Strategy 2020-2030 and outlines how the IBU will honour its commitment to establishing biathlon as a leader in promoting and upholding the highest standards of sustainability in sport.

The Policy builds on the work the IBU begun with the approval of its strategic plan Target 26 and demonstrates the IBU’s ambitions by going beyond minimum requirements and setting an example that will influence change across the world of sport.

Climate ActionGender EqualityGood HealthPeace and JusticeResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

FIFA’s Human Rights Policy

FIFA

FIFA recognises its obligation to uphold the inherent dignity and equal rights of everyone affected by its activities. This responsibility is enshrined in article 3 of the FIFA Statutes, according to which: FIFA is committed to respecting all internationally recognised human rights and shall strive to promote the protection of these rights.


This human rights policy specifies FIFA’s statutory human rights commitment and outlines FIFA’s approach to its implementation in accordance with the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Green Event Action Plan

IRF (International Rafting Federation)

The IRF’s aim is to ensure the sport of rafting is sustainable. To achieve this goal, each event should monitor and take appropriate actions to limit the impact on the environment.
Events have an impact on the environment through:

  • direct resources (electricity, water, food, etc);
  • indirect (consumption of energy and creation of Co2 related to transport to the events, etc);
  • the waste created immediately and on the longer term (dishes, equipment’s, paper, etc

All these elements compose the ecological footprint of an event. Environmental considerations have to be taken into account before, during, and after the events.


Before the event: Most of the ecological footprint reduction can be completed through good planning from the very beginning as that is when you set in stone the overall framework of the event.

During the event: During the event, the organizers need to make sure that the strategies agreed with the venues’ managers and other stakeholders are properly implemented. They will also need to assist attendees and participants in their own individual efforts to contribute to the event’s ecological footprint reduction.


After the event: Organizers will communicate the results to relevant people (venue’s managers, participants, etc).

It is important to take advantage of the efforts put into these event to spread the message that organizing greener events is possible.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

Sport for Climate Action

IOC (International Olympic Committee)

This guide to Climate Action is part of the “Sustainability Essentials” series developed by the IOC. IOC aim here is to provide a general understanding of the issues related to climate change and managing carbon (or greenhouse gas/GHG) emissions. The IOC examine what this means, why it is important, how it relates to sport and what a sport organisation can do to address climate change. In addition, IOC look at climate adaptation measures that organisations increasingly need to adopt in order to continue their day-to-day activities in the face of more extreme and variable weather patterns.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

The IOC sustainability strategy

IOC

Sustainability is one of the three pillars of Olympic Agenda 2020 alongside credibility and youth. In line with its recommendations, the IOC has developed a Sustainability Strategy. Based on the responsibility of the IOC as an organization, as the owner of the Olympic Games, and as the leader of the Olympic Movement, it focuses on infrastructure and natural sites, sourcing and resource management, mobility, workforce, and climate. 

Here you can find the following elements of the IOC sustainability strategy.

Climate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthLife Below WaterLife on LandPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Host Actors and Human Rights Due Diligence in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

Based on a case study from the Commonwealth Games, this paper explores the human rights duties and responsibilities of mega-sporting event (MSE) ‘Hosts’, defined as the event organising committee and their local and national government counterparts.


It reviews frameworks including UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UN Guiding Principles) and Children’s Rights and Business Principles as appropriate roadmaps for implementation by the state and private sector actors engaged in MSE delivery and legacy realisation.
It highlights an emerging area of good practice using a case study from the Commonwealth Sports Movement, providing an overview of the steps taken to date, future plans, and lessons learned so far. Whilst at an early stage, it provides a potential direction of travel for other international federations thinking of undertaking a similar journey to integrate human rights considerations in event hosting.


It concludes by reflecting on what this case study implies for an initiative for collective action, and how the initiative with the Commonwealth Sports Movement can provide valuable lessons to inform the development of more universal roles and functions.

It concludes by focusing on the changing support requirements the Commonwealth Sports Movement is likely to need over time as buy-in and capacity in relation to human rights are built.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthPeace and JusticeReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

World Triathlon Sustainability Guidelines for event organisers

International Triathlon Union

The science is clear.
What were once suppositions are now irrefutable facts.
Human activity has had an enormous negative impact on the Earth to the point that its regenerative capacities are overshot, threatening ecosystems and lives.
Like any other, the sports’ industry we belong to must share responsibility. It is our duty to minimise likely negative impacts and use our incredible potential to reach the masses and bring about positive change that can still make a difference.

This document is an invitation to our event organiser partners to engage in the journey of social, economic and environmental sustainability within and through the delivery of their event.
Some are already engaged, either on a voluntary basis or due to local legislation, and others have not yet started. Regardless of where you are on this journey, this
document offers a non-exhaustive list of actions to help keep you moving into the direction of sustainability.
It will also serve as a framework for a World Triathlon Sustainability certification system, which will recognise the commitments of Local Organising Committees (LOCs) to minimise their footprint.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

The Mega-Sporting Event Lifecycle – Embedding Human Rights from Vision to Legacy

Mega Sporting Events Platform

All organisations, including those in the world of sport, are responsible for respecting human rights. Through preventing potential negative human rights impacts linked to major events, and providing adequate remedies for abuses that do occur, all organisations involved in delivering a mega-sporting event can better harness sport’s potential for good.

The lifecycle for a mega-sporting event also serves as a microcosm for the whole range of business and human rights issues. With the large amount of public investment associated with these events, and their impacts on local communities, mega-sporting events should be delivered to exemplary standards in all respects – especially with regard for human rights.

The capacity of mega-sporting events to promote human rights is enhanced by the fact that sport is inherently tied to sporting values and fair play, and sport’s history of providing a stage for progressive interventions in issues such as community relations, discrimination, gender equality and personal and social development.

This guide presents the lifecycle of a mega-sporting event, with specific elements of good practice at each stage that those involved in hosting the event should integrate into their planning, delivery and legacy in order to ensure a rights-compliant event.

Download the English version of the guide

Download the French version of te guide

Download the Japanese version of the guide

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

IOC Gender Equality Review Project

IOC

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) has made great progress in promoting gender equality in terms of balancing the total number of athletes participating at the Games, offering leadership development, advocacy participating at the Games, offering leadership development, advocacy and awareness campaigns, and more recently appointing more women to leadership roles within the administration and governance. The priority of gender equality is reaffirmed in the Olympic Agenda 2020, Recommendation 11.


Meanwhile, many Olympic Movement stakeholders have also implemented significant gender equality initiatives so that girls and women are being given greater access and the opportunity to participate in sport.
However, there are still many challenges which need to be addressed, and the pace of progress is slow, particularly in this fast-paced environment.
To address those challenges, the IOC Executive Board (EB) launched the IOC Gender Equality.


Review Project on 16 March 2017 with a mandate to “push gender equality globally” with “action oriented recommendations for change.”


The adoption and implementation of these project recommendations will fulfil the IOC’s obligation under the Olympic Charter “to encourage and support the promotion of women in sport at all levels and in all structures.” It would also significantly contribute to the gender equality objectives of Goal 5 of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.


Promoting gender equality not only enhances the positive reputation of the IOC, it demonstrates corporate social responsibility to our commercial partners and it utilises the influence of the IOC to benefit society at large.
The positive impact of gender equality is well documented by social science research and business management studies.

Gender equality within the Olympic Movement creates opportunities for women to participate in public society and allows for women to contribute in roles of influence and decision-making responsibilities. It encourages physical activity and healthy lifestyles for women and girls. It encourages diversity of opinion, a key component of good governance and risk management.

Gender Equality
Guidelines and reports

FIH Quality Programme for Hockey turf

International Hockey Federation (FIH)

A new hockey field is a major investment and it is therefore important that it meets the expectations of hockey players, associations and clubs. To help ensure good quality fields are built for all levels of play, from elite level competition to community development, the FIH has developed an internationally recognised quality-assurance programme - the FIH Quality Programme for Hockey Turf. The programme was launched as part of an initiative of the Hockey Revolution - FIH's ten-year strategy for hockey.

Find out more about the programme by visiting the sections below :

Climate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

Cycling for all side events UCI toolkit for event organisers

Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI)

It is the UCI’s ambition to grow cycling in all forms around the world - be it for transport, recreation or competition. As part of this, we encourage and support our partners to host events that inspire the general public to cycle. The hosting of UCI sanctioned races provides an opportunity to organise side events that advocate and promote cycling beyond elite competitions. This guide provides advice on the development and hosting of Cycling for All side events, as well as practical examples of best practice.

Cycling for All side events may take various forms, depending on an organiser’s wider vision for their event.

This guide will provide case studies related to the following types of initiatives :

  • Activity areas for children
  • Travel by bike initiatives
  • Multi-sport experience zones
  • Race circuits open to the public
  • Sustainability promotion and environmental campaigns
  • Educational workshops
  • Cycle skills training
  • Closed street / car-free days
  • Tourism and regional development campaigns
  • Cycling festivals

Good HealthResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

UCI toolkit for national federations

Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI)

Promoting and enhancing everyday cycling is a core pillar of the UCI’s strategy, striving to ensure that elite cycling acts as a catalyst to inspire even greater mass participation, and get many more people using bikes as part of their everyday lives. Be it working with cycling advocacy partners, championing local, regional, national or international cycling initiatives or supporting National Federations with their cycling promotion programmes, the UCI’s Cycling for All programme is meant to support the realisation of a more bike friendly world.

This toolkit provides practical advice and knowledge for National Federations seeking to develop their own child cycle training programmes.

Climate ActionGood Health
Guidelines and reports

IOC Sustainability Report

IOC

The International Olympic Committee has published its Sustainability Report, tracking progress towards achieving its 18 sustainability objectives for 2020 across its three ‘spheres of responsibility’ – as an organisation, as the owner of the Olympic Games and as the leader of the Olympic Movement.

Here you can find the following elements of the IOC sustainability report

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructurePartnerships for the Goals
Guidelines and reports

Kazan Action Plan

UNESCO

UNESCO is the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. It seeks to build peace through international cooperation in Education, the Sciences and Culture. UNESCO's programmes contribute to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals defined in Agenda 2030, adopted by the UN General Assembly in 2015.

As a tool for aligning international and national policy in the fields of physical education, physical activity and sport with the United Nations 2030 Agenda, the Kazan Action Plan addresses the needs and objectives identified in the UN Action Plan on SDP. An integration of both these plans into a common framework is indispensable, in order to ensure enhanced coherence and synergies within the UN system, as well as a more effective mobilization of Member States and partners.

The Kazan Action Plan was adopted on 15 July 2017 by UNESCO’s Sixth International Conference of Ministers and Senior Officials Responsible for Physical Education and Sport, MINEPS VI. The text is the result of extensive consultations with UNESCO’s Member States, the  Intergovernmental Committee for Physical Education and Sport (CIGEPS) and its Permanent Consultative Council, as well as other experts and practitioners in the field of physical duration, physical activity  and sport policy.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthNo HungerNo PovertyPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Sport for Climate Action Framework

UN Climate Change invites sports organizations and their stakeholders to join a new climate action for sport movement. This initiative aims at supporting and guiding sports actors in achieving global climate change goals.

Sports organizations can display climate leadership by engaging together in the climate neutrality journey. They can achieve this by taking responsibility for their climate footprint, which in turn will incentivize climate action beyond the sports sector, and therefore help global ambition step-up in the face of the threat posed by climate change.

Uniting behind a set of principles, sports organizations and their communities have created an initiative by collaborating in order to position their sector on the path of the low carbon economy that global leaders agreed on in Paris: Sports for Climate Action

UN Climate Change welcomes the leadership of the International Olympic Committee in contributing to key areas of action within this movement, and invites other governing bodies, sport federations, leagues and clubs, to join and jointly develop the climate action agenda in sports, by leading and supporting specific working groups and by bringing their expertise, tools and best practices into this framework.

As of June 2020, more than 130 sports federations, clubs and other stakeholders signed the Sports for Climate Action Framework. Click here to see the list of signatories.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

Sport Education Partnership Framework

UNESCO

UNESCO is launching a dynamic, data-driven, multi-stakeholder Sport-Education Partnership (SEP) framework.

SEP will unite public and private stakeholders behind an integrated vision of development which harnesses the combined power of sport and education eco-systems to progress the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Agenda (3, 4, 5, 17).

The Sport-Education Partnership framework is impact-oriented and aims at creating transformative behaviourial- and systems-based change, starting with schools.

The first step for this was taken with the creation of UNESCO’s Quality Physical Education (QPE) Policy Package, which practically supports governments develop inclusive child-centered physical education policy.

Gender EqualityGood HealthPartnerships for the GoalsQuality Education
Guidelines and reports

Rio 2016 and Dow Using Technology and Collaboration to Deliver a Low-Carbon Legacy

The Rio 2016 Olympic Games are making history by leaving a significant legacy of low-carbon technologies in Latin America, while set to balance 2 million tonnes of CO2 equivalents. This will be achieved through the emission reductions obtained in initiatives in Brazil and Latin America described in this report.

Climate ActionLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

DOW 2018 Carbon report

The carbon mitigation programs follow the principles outlined in Dow’s Climate
Solutions Framework, a framework purposely built for these partnerships by Dow scientists together with external carbon experts. The Climate Solutions Framework allows event owners and organizations, in collaboration with partners, to implement a structured yet flexible approach to quantify and mitigate carbon footprints while also
leaving a positive social and economic legacy. These mitigation projects go beyond the physical boundaries of the events or the organization’s direct control, extending climate action to a global playing field.
Through its carbon mitigation projects, Dow has already delivered to date 4.3 million tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e).1 By 2026, the reductions are projected to exceed 6 million tonnes of CO2e.


Within this report, we describe Dow’s efforts to build capacity, drive change and achieve the adoption of low-carbon technologies. We hope the lessons learned will provide actionable advice to organizations across sectors to help build effective collaborations and accelerate the introduction of more sustainable technologies
globally.

Climate ActionLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

Youth and Sport Task Force

UNESCO / Youth and Sport

The Youth and Sport Task Force is an initiative of the UNESCO.  It represents creative, passionate and innovative young leaders across Asia and the Pacific who use sport as a tool for positive social change in their communities.

The youth are in control. They design their own programmes, determine their own priorities and collectively, decide on the strategic direction of the Task Force. UNESCO supports the Task Force by providing opportunities for the members to promote and enhance their work by connecting with each other and with regional and global opportunities for growth and capacity building.

All programmes represented by the Task Force are aligned with the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

We are cultivating a community of young change-makers who are already making a big impact, by youth, with youth, for youth.

Additional information available at https://www.youthandsport.org/ 

Gender EqualityPartnerships for the GoalsQuality Education
Guidelines and reports

IUCN – Sports and urban biodiversity

IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature)

A framework for achieving mutual benefits for nature and sports in cities

This guide provides a set of principles to help sports federations, local organising committee, developpers, investors and local ahthorities to incorporate the needs of urgan natures and biodiversity into their planning process. From setting up ecological monitoring systems to improving the management of habitats, there is a rande of ways in which the sports industry can help urban nature flourish

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

IUCN – Sport and biodiversity

IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature)

Sport can have significant negative impacts on biodiversity, through the construction and use of sports venues and the staging of sporting events. Understanding and managing the potential negative impacts and opportunities for conservation is vital for ensuring that sports venues and sporting events deliver successfully both from the financial and operational standpoint. This guide is designed to help decision makers understand these potential impacts, and to present options for mitigating them, as well as for maximising opportunities to use sport as a way to promote and enhance biodiversity conservation.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

IUCN – Mitigating biodiversity impacts of new sports venues

IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature)

Wherever a new sports venue is built, or the refurbishment of an existing venue is undertaken, it is likely that biodiversity will be affected by that development, although the significance of impacts on biodiversity – both negative and positive – will vary enormously from sport to sport and location to location. Sports organisations, public authorities and financial institutions as well as those involved in the actual construction and decommissioning of venues all have a role to play in managing the range of impacts that sport venues may have on biodiversity. This includes implementing different measures that can be taken to mitigate any negative impacts and adopting approaches that contribute to biodiversity conservation. Moreover, with careful planning and design, new sports venues and the expansion of existing sites or temporary facilities can, in some cases, even contribute to an overall gain of biodiversity. This report offers in-depth guidance on how to integrate biodiversity considerations in the development of a new venue or a temporary facility, including five checklists covering all aspects from the early planning stage and site selection to the decommissioning.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

IUCN – Mitigating biodiversity impacts of sports events

IUCN (International Union for Conservation of Nature)

There is growing recognition of the need for sport and sports events to be conducted in socially and environmentally responsible ways and this is reflected in the attitudes of governments, public authorities and regulators. This means that taking a proactive and diligent approach to environmental management is a vital part of the sport sector’s licence to operate as well as growing and sustaining fan bases. Biodiversity conservation should be a key element in any environmentally responsible approach to sports event management. These guidelines focus on the often complex links between biodiversity and sport, and highlight that sports events can also benefit biodiversity. Each event offers an opportunity to raise public awareness of the value of nature and influence attitudes towards biodiversity and its conservation. These guidelines provide an overview of the issues and risks. They also offer help on how to make informed choices in avoiding harmful impacts and achieving positive outcomes. All parties involved in the planning and delivery of sports events are responsible for understanding and managing the potential biodiversity impacts and opportunities to ensure no lasting harm, and preferably a lasting positive legacy.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability Introduction : How to get started

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Here you can find informations to get started on creating a sustainable sports event. The different topics include management buy-in, funding and financing, education, available resources and engagement. (Video 6/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

2018 Sporting Chance Principles on Sport and Human Rights

Centre for Sport and Human Rights (CSHR)

Sport relies on a rules-based system, fair play, respect and the courage, cohesion, support and goodwill of society in all its facets, including athletes, fans, workers, volunteers and local communities, as well as governments, businesses large and small, the media and sports bodies. The foundational principles of the world’s preeminent sports bodies speak to universal humanitarian values, harmony among nations, solidarity and fair play, the preservation of human dignity, and commitment to non-discrimination. These values have much in common with international human rights instruments, principles and standards. Recognising that there is a generation of work to be done to fully align the world of sport with the fundamental principles of human dignity, human rights, and labour rights; the Advisory Council of the Centre for Sport and Human Rights are committed to working towards the fulfilment of these Sporting Chance Principles.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Sustaining Sydney: The ‘Green Olympics’ from a global perspective

Taylor and Francis Online

'Will Sydney continue on into the new millennium with a vision for sustainable living, as their Government has promised? Or will it be business as usual?' - this was the question posed by Murray Hogarth (1999), environment editor for the Sydney MorningHerald'in the weeks leading up to the 1999 New South Wales state election. Now, as we have entered what many environmentalists hoped to call the 'green century', there is an increasingly pressing need to consider what transformations in human systems may be required to halt and reverse the degradation of the global ecosystem.

Innovation and InfrastructureSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

The contribution of sports to the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals Foundation

This toolkit aims to identify and showcase the crucial role sports plays in mobilizing support and creating public awareness of the SDGs. By highlighting successful case studies from the private sector, UN entities, Member States and non-governmental organizations (NGOs), this toolkit is expected to serve as a guide on how to create sustainable partnerships around sport.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthNo PovertyPeace and JusticeQuality EducationSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability : Impact Assessment-Environmental

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Environmental Impact Assessment. Why measure, what it is, and how to measure it. (Video 8/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability : Impact Assessment-Data Gathering

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Topics include ethical issues, cost and finance issues, possible partnerships, as well as the 7 steps to successful data gathering. (Video 12/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Kit Manif (French document)

City of Lausanne and Canton of Vaud

Kit manif is a toolkit dedicated to facilitate the organization of sport and cultural events. KITmanif supports each organizer throughout the different phases of the event (planning, development and dismantling) with advice, practical tools and proposals from local service providers. Each section of Kitmanif aims to guarantee the sustainability of the events by considering it, not as an additional element to take into account, but as an integral part, a mode of reflection, in order to minimize the environmental impacts of the events while integrating social objectives and ensuring financial balance.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionGender EqualityGood HealthReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIAS Sustainability report 2015

Fédération Internationale de SAMBO (FIAS)

The FIAS sustainability report 2015 is created inorder to introduce sustainable practices in FIAS events.

Climate ActionGood HealthQuality EducationResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Philadelphia Eagles 2019 Sustainability Report

Philadelphia American football Club

What started with a blue recycling bin under each employee’s desk in 2003 has grown into a company-wide sustainability program that works year-round to reduce the team’s environmental footprint. With the help of partners and fans, the Philadelphia Eagles have been able to develop a multi-year curriculum and action plan that incorporates green energy production, recycling, composting, energy efficiency and reforestation, among other ventures.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionInnovation and InfrastructurePartnerships for the GoalsResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

A guide to making claims in relation to the Sustainable Golf Development Voluntary Sustainability Standard

Geo Foundation

This document is intended to guide project teams that have used the Sustainable Golf Development Voluntary Sustainability Standard (VSS) on the kinds of claims they can make about their project. By following this guide, a project team can confidentially and accurately communicate the achievements of their work.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIFA FORWARD Development Programme Regulations

FIFA

FIFA Forward launched a new era of global football development. FIFA is further strengthening its investment in development to build a stronger foundation for the growth of football, aiming at allowing many more young girls and boys to experience “Living Football”.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureNo HungerNo PovertyPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Climate solutions framework for events – A summary

Global events, such as the Olympic Games, can be a significant source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Construction, operations and spectator travel are just some of the ways that large events produce GHG emissions. However, by employing low-carbon technologies and behavioral practices to mitigate these emissions, events can become innovative catalysts for sustainable development and leave a positive and lasting legacy on the host region, city or state.

The Dow Chemical Company (“Dow”), the official Carbon Partner of Sochi 2014 and Rio 2016, has developed the Climate Solutions Framework (herein “the Framework”) with the hopes of encouraging voluntary mitigation programs across the world.

Climate ActionLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

Dow Climate Solutions Framework 2.0 – A Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Framework for Events

Anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions have been at the forefront of international policy discussion for several decades.
The overwhelming majority of climate scientists agree that human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels (e.g., coal, oil, and gas), are responsible for most of the climate changes currently being observed.3,4 While international policy makers continue to work for emissions limitation and reduction commitments that stabilize GHG concentrations, it is clear that businesses need to be responsible for the economic, environmental and social dimensions of their pursuits, and for developing solutions to help make the planet a good place to live for future generations.
Climate change affects all of us and is generating new and emerging challenges as well as opportunities for business.
These economic and ecological challenges should be approached with urgency and ingenuity. They require innovations that
reconsider how we source, process, produce and distribute the energy, food, water and goods that make life healthy and
productive.5 Forward-thinking business leaders realize that the new risks posed by climate change are, and will continue to be, important for their organizations’ competitive advantage, growth and development.6,7 Within these risks lie opportunities for organizations to improve competitiveness through long-term strategic investment into low-GHG technologies, sustainable products and energy-efficient solutions.

The Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Framework for Events (or Framework) was specifically designed to assist with quantifying and mitigating the climate impacts of events. Currently, hosts of events are not required to account for greenhouse gas emissions; any attempt to do so is entirely voluntary. As a result, events provide an excellent opportunity for organizations to demonstrate their environmental leadership. The Framework attempts to not only account for the reduction of GHG emissions in an event’s inventory, but to also act as an incentive to implement new workable, cost-effective mitigation projects that can create transformative change over and above the direct emissions reductions associated with the event’s impact. By voluntarily assuming responsibility for the sustainability goals of an event and sponsoring projects that introduce low emissions technologies, organizers and their corporate partners can move above and beyond simply accounting for an event’s climate impacts; they can deliver lasting economic, environmental and social benefits to the event’s host city or region.

Climate ActionLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability : Impact Assessment-Social

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Social Impact Assessment. Why measure, what it is, and how to measure it. (Video 9/12)

Gender EqualityGood HealthPeace and JusticeReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Richmond (Vancouver) Sustainable Events – 7 Step Quick Guide

Richmond Olympic Oval

City of Richmond Quick Start Guide for sustainable events, developed with the Richmond Olympic Oval in close partnership with the AISTS (International Academy of Sports Science and Technology), in Lausanne, Switzerland.

Clean Water and SanitationClimate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIA Magazine – Sustainable Motorsport

International Automobile Federation

The second issue of AUTO this year includes conversation starters, ideas and opinions on several important topics. The cover story deals with a subject much in the news: how motor sport can play its part when it comes to ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

The Ocean Race – Champions for the Sea Learning Programme (English, Français, Espagnol)

The Ocean Race

The Champions for the Sea programme will help you and your students (aged 6-12 years) discover the excitement of sailing through The Ocean Race, the importance of the Ocean and how Ocean health is threatened. Through the practical activities and worksheets developed, and using Social and Emotional Learning techniques (SEL) you and your students will be encouraged and empowered to take positive action for the Ocean with a true understanding of how we can all make a difference and become Champions for the Sea!

Climate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandQuality EducationResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

AISTS Collected Insights from the Field of Sports – Sustainability & Legacy

Olympic World Library

Sustainability and legacy are presently two of the major challenges for the sports event industry. In the past two decades, governing bodies, event organisers, cities, companies and professional sports leagues have all been reflecting on how best to embed these challenges into the organisation of sports events. This book from the AISTS (International Academy of Sports Science and Technology) is the second in the series ‘Collected Insights from the Field of Sports’. It concentrates on the two aforementioned challenges of sustainability and legacy in sport. The chapters in this book are derived from research papers that have been produced by the participants and visiting professors of the AISTS postgraduate programme, the AISTS MSA (Master of Advanced Studies in Sports Administration and Technology). Being grounded in research, the book aims to correct the imbalance between the sustainability and legacy theories and practices in the world of sport. Our intention is that its outcomes can be utilised by academics, sports administrators, sports teams, students and the public to engage in the discussion on sports sustainability and legacy.

Innovation and InfrastructureReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Sambo Quick Start Sustainability Event Guide

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

This quick start brochure, developed in collaboration with AISTS, gives concrete guidance to SAMBO event organisers in getting started with sustainability.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationPartnerships for the Goals
Guidelines and reports

Theorising the Relationship between Major Sport Events and Social Sustainability

Molecular Diversity Preservation International (MDPI)

This paper assess whether major sport events meet the social needs of present and future generations and to review why certain effects occur.

Climate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Environmental guidelines for sustainable FIS World Championships

International Ski Federation (FIS)

It is the intention of the FIS to have the competitions executed according to the current sporting rules under fair conditions for the athletes and with respect for the cultural and social achievements of the organising country. FIS considers these aspects to be integrated in the responsibility to take care of nature and the environment as an essential basis for the sustainability of ski sport.

Clean Water and SanitationInnovation and InfrastructureResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

AISTS Collected Insights from the Field of Sports – Football & Society

Olympic World Library

This book is the first of its kind from the International Academy of Sports Science and Technology (AISTS) and provides practical insight in several aspects of the management of football. It does not provide a total solution to the many problems within the game but it aims to be a showcase of what can be achieved with the cooperation of academics and higher education participants. The studies in this book are derived from relevant research papers that have been produced by the participants and visiting professors of the AISTS postgraduate programme, the AISTS MSA (Master of Advanced Studies in Sports Administration).

Gender EqualityInnovation and InfrastructureQuality EducationSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability Introduction : Impact Assessment

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Impact Assessment. It covers why we measure the impact of an event, methods of measures used (quantitative and qaulitative). It details economic, social and environmental impacts, how to measure them amd communicate the results to stakeholders. (Video 5/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Playing against the Clock: Global Sport, the Climate Emergency and the Case for Rapid Change

David Goldblatt

Climate change is touching every aspect of human life and global sport is no exception: in 2019, the Rugby World Cup was disrupted by unprecedented pacific typhoons; in early 2020, the Australian Tennis Open was disrupted by the smoke blowing in from the country's devastating bush fire. The Tokyo 2020 Olympics were forced to move long distance running events north of the capital as the city's sweltering summer weather nos makes them impossible tu run.

The following report is divided in three sections :

  • Section 1 includes a review of the many ways in which climate change is already taking its toll on global sport
  • Section 2 is dedicated to the measurement of global sport's carbon emission
  • Section 3 shows the state of sport's environmental commitment

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

IIHF Manual for Sustainable events

Inernational Ice Hockey Federation (IIHF)

This manual helps identify simple steps that make an ice hockey event more sustainable by presenting checklists, examples and links for the areas of transportation, waste and littering, energy, procurement, and access and social inclusion.

Climate ActionGender EqualityResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Healthy Stadia – Active Travel Guidance For Sports Stadia

Healthy Stadia

This guidance aims to help people connected with sports club to be more physically active by encouraging them to adopt active modes of transport to and from their facilities. Sports clubs and their facilities have a lot to gain from encouraging active travel, including a healthier fan-base, a more active workforce who take less sick leave, through to less pressure on car parking spaces, improved air quality around your stadium and an enhanced social responsibility profile.

Good HealthSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability Introduction: ISO 20121 Management System

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Here you will learn about the ISO 20121 Management System is a way of working. It tells us what the standard is, describes how to create a sustainability policy and adapt the framework to your event and company values. It describes process of getting the certification. (Video 3/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Guidelines for the Sustainable Organisation of Events (2018)

Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)"

These Guidelines, published by the Federal (Germany) Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB), aim to assist the organisers and planners of events (such as conferences, meetings, summits etc.) in recognising the necessary demands made by sustainability.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionGender EqualityInnovation and InfrastructureLife on LandReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Cycling delivers on the global goals (collab with European cyclist federation)

UCI Guidelines

Guidelines and reports

Environmental Sustainability Policy and Guidelines

International Rowing Federation (FISA)

Rowing is a sport that requires clean water and clean air. Rowers are mindful of protecting the environment on which they must rely to carry on their sport. The intention of this document is to record World Rowing Federation's (FISA) commitment to rowing practices, which continue that association and encourage a culture of responsibility for protecting nature and therefore the sustainability of the sport. The document highlights important issues and appropriate ways of dealing with them in accordance with sustainable environmental practice.

Clean Water and SanitationResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

2019 World Rugby Year in Review

World Rugby

Welcome to the Year in Review 2019, a comprehensive account of events on and off the field that have defined a truly special year for our sport

Gender EqualityQuality Education
Guidelines and reports

AISTS International Federations Sustainability Study 2017

Olympic World Library

International Federations Study (IF Study) conducted in 2017 by AISTS in collaboration with ARISF. The objective of this study is to understand the current situation, trends and needs amongst IOC recognised international sports federations with regards to sustainability. It assesses initiatives, trends and needs from its findings.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

UNEP – Sustainable Events Guide (2012)

Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB)

This guide draws on long-standing practical experience and offers organisers a wealth of concrete, easily understandable and accessible advice including on management issues, sector-specific recommendations, and action-oriented checklists. It consists of six sections that can be used separately

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sustainable Development in Basketball Arenas

International Basketball Federation (FIBA)

Prompted by Agenda 21, a world-wide programme directed by the United Nations, many countries have agreed to adopt policies aimed at sustainable development. In recent years, the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has also focused on environmental protection and sustainable development, leading to the adoption of the Olympic Movement’s Agenda 21. The section on “Sport and the Environment” states that energy saving in sports facilities is a priority issue.

Clean Water and SanitationInnovation and Infrastructure
Guidelines and reports

Sport and Sustainable development goals

United Nations

The processes and milestones which led to the historic adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in 2015 were followed by the Sport for Development and Peace community with strong interest and a commitment to continue using sport as a unique tool to support this new global plan of action. As a result of joint efforts, particularly including UN Member States’ support to recognize the contribution of sport to the SDGs, Heads of State and Government and High Representatives declared in the Political Declaration for the new Agenda: "Sport is also an important enabler of sustainable development. We recognize the grow- ing contribution of sport to the realization of development and peace in its promotion of tolerance and respect and the contributions it makes to the empowerment of women and of young people, individuals and communities as well as to health, education and social inclusion objectives".

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Education Materials

World Confederation of Underwater Activities (CMAS)

CMAS presents the booklet „Coral Reef Knowledge“ within the International Year of the Reef 2018. The purpose of IYOR 2018 is to raise awareness of the devastating prognoses for coral reefs and their effects on nature and humans as well as possible options for action in society. Therfore you will find all important facts about coral reefs and their environment in this booklet. It is available in english and french and support the Education for Sustainable Development. If you are interested to use the booklet in your own CMAS federation in another language, please, feel free to contact the President of the Scientific Committee. Enjoy it in English and French online!

Life Below Water
Guidelines and reports

Borussia Dortmund Sustainability Report 2018/2019 (German)

Borussia Dortmund Football Club

"We are working hard to achieve this and see dynamic development in many areas. This report documents the status and progress in our sporting, economic, social and ecological fields. It opens up a holistic view of our work in these areas and shows many connections." (message from the BVB's directing team)

Climate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIA Environmental Programme

International Automobile Federation

The FIA Environmental Accreditation Programme is aimed at helping motor sport stakeholders worldwide to measure and enhance their environmental performance. By introducing clear and consistent environmental management into motor sport, it provides stakeholders with a three-level framework against which to accredit their activities.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

DIVERSITY AND ANTI-DISCRIMINATION AT FIFA

FIFA

Racism and discrimination affect society at large, and football is no exception. Their impact on our sport is undeniable. FIFA recognises its responsibility to lead the way in abolishing all forms of discrimination in our game, but also to make the most of the influence football has beyond the pitch, thereby contributing to the fight against this scourge of society.

Peace and Justice
Guidelines and reports

GIZ Guide to Sustainable Event Management

Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ)

This guide introduces the topic of Sustainable Event Management and offers practical guidance, including a phase model which shows the task packages of sustainable event organisation in chronological order. This is followed by a more detailed description of the seven fields of activity. The guide also provides practice-oriented checklists, which will give a variety of references to each field of activity.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureLife on LandResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Great Lake Bay Invitational GEO Certification report

GEO Foundation

GEO concurs with the Council for Responsible Sport’s verification assessment that, having achieved 45 out of the 47 credits sought, and with Continual Improvement Points set for the future, the 2019 Dow Great Lakes Bay Invitational has earned the award of GEO Certified® Tournament status.

Climate ActionLife Below WaterResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Environmental Handbook for Towed Water Sports

International Waterski and Wakeboard Federation

This handbook is based on an extensive literature review on the impact of water skiing, wakeboarding, and boating on the environment. Most of this handbook’s facts and findings are based on conclusions drawn from numerous papers, reports, books, and studies and can be found in the bibliography. The recommended best practices and practical steps were developed primarily by The International Water Ski & Wakeboard Federation (IWWF), with contributions made by various individuals and respected water ski and boating organizations from around the world.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and Sanitation
Guidelines and reports

Sustainability education program

World Sailing

World Sailing, in partnership with the World Sailing Trust and 11th Hour Racing, have released a Sustainability Education Programme, developed with The Ocean Race, for sailing clubs and parents as part of its Agenda 2030 - sailing's commitment to global sustainability. The Sustainability Education Programme materials were developed with The Ocean Race, capitalising on the success of their own programme in the 2017-2018 edition of the race, and have been split into six topics each comprising of a booklet, trainer's guide and worksheet for age groups 6-8, 8-10 and 10-12.

Clean Water and SanitationLife Below WaterQuality EducationResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

UCI cycling for all manifesto

UCI Guidelines

Guidelines and reports

UIM Sustainable Sport and Event Toolkit

Union Internationale Motonautique (UIM)

The SSET is a project inspired by the shared willingness of the UNESCO and the UIM to use the example of the Powerboating Sport for the implementation of the conclusions of the Kazan Action Plan in the field of Sport and to convert the policy declarations contained therein into measurable action. The aim of the project is to give Sports Federations and their affiliated entities in their role as event organisers the tools required to incorporate sustainability in their work and to plan and deliver sustainable events.

Gender EqualityQuality EducationResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability : Impact Assessment-Economics

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Economic Impact Assessment. Why measure, what it is, and how to measure it. (Video 10/12)

Decent Work and Economic GrowthInnovation and InfrastructureNo HungerNo PovertyPartnerships for the Goals
Guidelines and reports

Sustainable sourcing in sport

IOC (International Olympic Committee)

This Guide is part of the "Sustainability Essentials" series developped by the IOC. It is intended to help organisations within the Olympic Movement and the wider sports sector to adopt more sustainable sourcing practices. The choices your organisation makes in the sourcing of goods and services will be fundamental to how you address sustainability as a whole. This is because most of the direct and indirect impacts you have on the environment, people, communities and businesses will stem from how you spend your money. Every item or project ultimately has a price and has to be paid for. How you decide which goods and services you want is ultimately under your control.

Responsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Olympic Games guide on Sustainable Sourcing

IOC (International Olympic Committee)

All IOC support services and material are shaped by the IOC’s “Olympic Agenda 2020” and, following the recommendations of Olympic Agenda 2020, the “New Norm”. The New Norm consists of 118 practical measures aimed at reducing the cost and complexity of the Olympic and Paralympic Games delivery model and covers the entire lifecycle of a Games edition from candidature to legacy realisation.

Responsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Introduction to sustainability

IOC (International Olympic Committee)

This is the introductory guide to the "Sustainability Essentials” series developed by the IOC. IOCaim here is to provide a general understanding of sustainability: what it means, why it is important, how it relates to sport and what a sport organisation can do to be part of this critical endeavour. IOC have compiled this general overview of sustainability as it is essential for National Olympic Committees (NOCs) and International Sports Federations (IFs) – indeed any sports organisation – to have a basic understanding of how sustainability is relevant to sport, and how to go about developing an effective sustainability programme that also leaves lasting legacies.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Carbon footprint methodology for the Olympic Games

IOC (International Olympic Committee)

Since the mid-2000s it has become standard practice for Olympic Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games (OCOGs) to measure the carbon footprint of their respective Olympic and Paralympic Games projects. However, the methodologies used have been inconsistent, which lessens the transfer of knowledge potential from one Games to another, as well as causing successive OCOGs to start from scratch. This Guide has been developed to assist and facilitate OCOGs in addressing the measuring of greenhouse gas emissions with a consistent methodology and to shorten inevitable learning curve in this field.

Climate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

The Role of Small-Scale Sports Events in Developing Sustainable Sport Tourism

Apstract

This report highlights the demand side of the sport tourism market, investigating the behavioral profile of the participants of an international fencing tournament. It identifies and discusses issues regarding the role of sports organizations and tourism agencies in cities hosting such events to increase the sustainable tourism potential of small-scale sports events in the future.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sustainable Sport and Event Toolkit (SSET)

European Athletics, AISTS, Vancouver 2010

The SSET is a project initiated by the Vancouver Organizing Committee for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games (VANOC) and the International Academy of Sports Science and Technology (AISTS) in Lausanne. It is currently being developed with the assistance of the International Olympic Committee (IOC), European Athletics and other partners from the world of sport.

Innovation and InfrastructureResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport for Protection Toolkit – Programming with Young People in Forced Displacement Settings

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), IOC, Terre des hommes organisation (Tdh)

This toolkit represents the next step in an ongoing collaboration that aims to better understand the role that sport can play in the protection and well-being of refugee and internally displaced young people. It builds on more than 20 years of work between UNHCR and the International Olympic Committee to bring sport to some of the world’s most disadvantaged young people. In September 2017, the IOC, supported closely by UNHCR, launched the Olympic Refuge Foundation. The goal is to harness the power of sport to strengthen the protection, development and empowerment environments for vulnerable children and youth.

Gender EqualityGood HealthReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

How sports win from being sustainable

UEFA, WWF, Greensport Alliance

Environmental leadership is an increasingly important issue for all sport stakeholders and major sport events. Environmentally conscious operations are no longer solely a focus of visionary thinking, but have become a vital operational and economic requirement for federations, teams, rights holders, host cities, leisure activities and partners linked to the sport movement. UEFA, WWF and the Green Sports Alliance have led the development of a report which is designed to bring together good practices by key stakeholders of the sport movement: from federations, teams, fans, sporting goods manufacturers and venue operators, to sponsoring partners, environmental organisations and policymakers. Its main objective is to highlight innovative solutions which enhance the environmental and sustainable performance of sports.

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

Guidelines for a Quality Trail Experience

International Mountain Bike Association (IMBA)

IMBA was founded in 1988 by a group of California mountain bike clubs concerned about the closure of trails to cyclists. These clubs believed that mountain biker education programs and innovative trail management solutions should be developed and promoted. While this first wave of threatened trail access was concentrated in California, IMBA’s pioneers saw that crowded trails and trail user conflict were fast becoming worldwide recreation issues. This is why they chose “International Mountain Bicycling Association” as the organization’s name.

Innovation and InfrastructureSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIFA Diversity Award

FIFA

In 2016, FIFA created an annual award to recognise an outstanding organisation, initiative or football personality that stands up for diversity and anti-discrimination in football at national or international level and on a sustained basis. At the 2017 award ceremony in London, FIFA Secretary General Fatma Samoura presented the trophy to US organisation Soccer Without Borders (SWB), who are using football as a tool for capacity building with refugees in the USA, Nicaragua and Uganda. SWB was chosen ahead of the other finalists, the Kenyan organisation Moving the Goalposts, the international network Discover Football (Germany) and the Indonesian organisation Uni Papua Football Community.

Sustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Richmond (Vancouver) Sustainable Events Toolkit

Richmond Sustainable Event

Sustainable Event Toolkit, developed by the City of Richmond and the Richmond Olympic Oval providing event organizers with guidance and resources to improve the environmental , social, and economic impacts associated with their event.

Clean Water and SanitationInnovation and InfrastructureResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability Introduction : Reporting

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Good Reporting, going beyond regulations. It discusses how reporting enables us to sets goals, measure, and builds trust with stakeholders. It details the frameworks used, performance indicators, the 3 GRI reporting levels and assurance. (Video 4/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Enhancing the Contribution of Sport to the Sustainable Development Goals

The Commonwealth

The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by the United Nations General Assembly in September 2015, sets out a ‘supremely ambitious and transformational vision’ for global development (UNGA 2015). Central to the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development are 17 SDGs broken down into 169 targets and 230 associated indicators. The SDGs seek to build on and complete progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that they replaced, but they are also more comprehensive and far-reaching in scope. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development emphasises that the SDGs are intended to be ‘integrated and indivisible and balance the three dimensions of sustainable development: the economic, social and environmental’.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sustainability Concept UEFA EURO 2024 Germany

UEFA

Since the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the Oeko-Institut has served as an ongoing source of advice on environmental issues for the DFB. It has also developed participatory events and produced decision-making aids for clubs and event organisers. As part of their collaboration, the DFB and the Oeko-Institut have prepared a comprehensive Sustainability Concept for the UEFA EURO 2024 football championship.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureNo PovertyPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

DOSB Internet Portal Green Champions 2.0 for Sustainable Sports Events (German & English)

Green Champions

Internet portal based on a document entitled “Green Champions for Sports and the Environment. Guidelines for environmentally friendly large sports events”. The portal’s target audience includes organizers and interested parties seeking information about concrete possible actions for planning and executing sustainable sports events. The website offers a topical overview of concrete actions – also regarding the various steps of an event. These measures are available as downloadable PDF checklists.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIFA Child safeguarding tookit for member associations

FIFA

As the global governing body for football, FIFA is committed to supporting its members to implement best practice to keep children safe and ensure involvement in football is fun for all. While FIFA does not control the day-to-day operations of our members, or their affiliated organisations and clubs who are independently organised, this toolkit sets minimum requirements for all members on child safeguarding.

Gender EqualityQuality EducationSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Case study about the creation of a roadmap for a sustainable events destination (GS2018)

Positive Impact

Guidelines on on the leadership undertaken by the Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games (GC2018) to follow existing international best practices and provide examples on how to do so.

Climate ActionResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

NGO Briefing in Response to Official Disclosure of Tropical Timber Use for Tokyo 2020 Olympics

Tokyo 2020

A report highlighting the failure of Tokyo 2020 to provide meaningful assurance that the timber used for construction was harvested legally and consistent with the Olympic commitment to sustainability.

Innovation and InfrastructureResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability Introduction : Benefits of sustainable events

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Here you will learn how to identify and quantify the tangible and intangible benefits of sustainable events. This includes cost saving, how to generate growth, stakeholders' satisfaction, attractiveness for sponsors and the uniqueness of sports events. (Video 2/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sustainability Concept for the Olympic Winter Games – Munich 2018 Candidate City

Green Champions

Large sporting events have the power to create excitement among millions of people across the globe. At the same time, these types of events also leave their mark. Garbage, noise, emissions of greenhouse gases and air contaminants, the sealing of surfaces and consumption of materials involved in the extension and construction of sports complexes, as well as the consumption of energy and water related to the events themselves create burdens on humans, the environment and nature. Winter sports are viewed particularly critically due to their use of large areas and the intervention in nature and in the landscape often related to this. Sustainable development is based on the assumption that today's generations will utilise natural resources in a manner that ensures a functioning ecological, economic and social structure for future generations. Against this background, sustainability has also become an important issue in the discussion surrounding the Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games and the Olympic legacy.

Climate ActionInnovation and InfrastructureLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

A Practical Guide to Hosting Radically Responsible Events (Nuun & Council for Responsible Sports

Nuun hydration

Imagine a running event that brought joy and health to the community without leaving a trace on our planet... As we inspire, motivate, and help millions of people get moving through our events, we are consistently having a negative impact on the Earth. The good news is that just because ‘we’ve always done it that way’ does not mean we have to stay on the same path moving forward. Nuun is on a mission to empower more muuvment. This mission stands on three pillars: Clean Product, Clean Sport and Clean Planet. Our partnership with the Council for Responsible Sport is an extension of these core values and we are proud to support the creation of this comprehensive 10-Step Guide to more sustainable sports events.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIAS Environmental Policy

FIAS

The FIAS Environment Policy supports the aims and principles regarding sustainable responsibility in the activities assumed by FIAS. This includes its events, equipment used and office operations. The Federation will be held accountable in preserving the environment and managing resources through its practices in hosting events.

Quality EducationResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

FIAS Sustainability report 2016

Fédération Internationale de SAMBO (FIAS)

The FIAS sustainability report 2016 is created inorder to introduce sustainable practices in FIAS events.

Climate ActionGood HealthQuality EducationResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

A Small-Scale Event and a Big Impact: Is this Relationship Possible in the World of Sport? The Meaning of Heritage Sporting Events for Sustainable Development of Tourism

Apstract

This article highlights the importance of sporting events at a small scale, as well as heritage sporting events for sustainable development of tourist destinations. It mentions that the big social potential lies in the organization of small-scale sports events which can then impact tourist revival and improvement of the regions’ image.

Climate ActionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Corpus Christi Yacht Club Sustainability Report

11th Hour Racing

The Corpus Christi Youth Sailing World Championships marks a key step for World Sailing in its delivery of its Sustainability Agenda 2030 which sets out sustainability targets across the sport of sailing.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionGender EqualityLife Below WaterResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

FIFA World Cup Qatar 2022 : Development of the Sustainability Strategy

FIFA

This document sets out in detail the approach taken by the tournament organisers to identify our strategic priorities and define our strategic objectives in order to maximise the tournament’s contribution to people’s well-being, economic development and environmental protection in the short and long term.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionPeace and JusticeQuality Education
Guidelines and reports

Vestas 11th Hour Racing Sustainability Report

11th Hour Racing

Vestas 11th Hour Racing highlights the use of sailing to raise awareness on pressing environmental issues, and help to source solutions to mitigate the problem, while achieving exemplary race results.

Climate ActionLife Below Water
Guidelines and reports

Plastic game plan for sport

IOC (International Olympic Committee)

This Guide is part of the "Sustainability Essentials" series developped by the IOC. It provides ideas to get you started and examples of progress from across the sporting community. It will help you to create a plastic plan and to work with suppliers, athletes and fans to reduce, reuse and recycle.

Clean Water and SanitationClimate ActionLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Sport and the Sustainable Development Goals

United Nations

A UNOSDP overview outlining the contribution of sport to the SDGs.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyPartnerships for the GoalsPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability : Data Gathering issues with Impact Assessment

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. Data gathering Issues. Discussing the key priliminary issues like what to measure, where to measure and using results from similar events. This key point also disusses the different methods of data gathering (Quantitative and Qualitative data), validity, reliability and quality of data. (Video 11/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

2020 FIS Mainau Manifesto

International Ski Federation

In 1994, the first FIS Mainau Manifesto was unanimously approved by the FIS Congress. This was a pioneering commitment to the responsibility of snow sports towards nature and sustainability. The Manifesto was motivated by the 1992 UN Conference on Environment and Development.

Climate ActionLife on LandPartnerships for the Goals
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability : Introduction to Impact Assessment

SandSI, AISTS ,PI, IOC, SportAccord

This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. This module starts with why we should measure the impact of a sport event and its importance, and the different stages of an event when it makes an impact. It introduces the key points of the following types of impact (economic, social and environment), data gathering and cost issues. (Video 7/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Sustainable Golf Development Voluntary Sustainability Standard

Geo Foundation

In the 21st Century, more and more businesses, organizations and individuals are building sustainability into their day- to-day decision making. Understanding how we do business is as important to today’s customer as what we do. There are a growing number of golf facilities that have found ‘being more sustainable’ meant doing things simpler, better and faster. The Sustainable Golf Development Voluntary Sustainability Standard (VSS) provides a framework for the effective integration of sustainability into the design and construction processes for golf projects.

Affordable and Clean EnergyResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Glamorgan Cricket Club Sustainability Report

Glamorgan Cricket Club

The Well-being of Future Generations (Wales) Act seeks to achieve a globally significant set of national goals that would make Wales one of the most sustainable societies in the world. Although the legislation applies to named public bodies, as an organisation that receives public money and takes its obligations to society very seriously, we (Glamorgan County Cricket Club) voluntarily commit to these goals.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthNo PovertyResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Sustainability Operations Arizona State University

Healthy Stadia

Annual Report (2013) of Arizona State University taking measurable steps to reduce consumption, maximize efficiency and to rethink products and processes by focusing on four key areas: climate neutrality; zero solid and water waste; active engagement; and principled practice.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Sustainability agenda 2030

World Sailing

World Sailing’s Sustainability Agenda 2030 sets out a bold ambition to achieve substantial change within the sport which can contribute actively to global sustainability. Sustainability Agenda 2030 is supported by World Sailing’s vision and mission which was launched in October 2016.

Clean Water and SanitationInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

The futur of the winter olympics in a warmer world

International Ski Federation (FIS)

The Olympic Winter Games will commemorate its first centennial in 2024. This celebration of winter sport has grown tremendously from just over 250 athletes representing 16 countries, competing in 16 medal events at the 1924 games in Chamonix, France, to over 2500 athletes representing 82 countries, competing in 86 medal events at the 2010 games in Vencouver, Canada.

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

TUNZA: The UNEP Magazine for Youth – Sport and the Environment

United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP)

A magazine about sport, environment and legacy from the UNEP created for young people, by young people, about young people. Including short case studies from a wide range of sport events, examples of high-profile ambassadors, calls-to-action and more.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthLife Below WaterLife on LandResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

The International Federation of Sport Climbing (IFSC) has produced a set of Sustainability Guidelines which aim to provide simple, practical and essential information for Member Federations and Event Organisers to develop effective sustainability programmes, therefore maximizing the positivie impact of Sport Climbing in environmental, social and economic matters. As these areas overlap, they should be addressed with a single, integrated approach.

The Guidelines also outline the ways in which the IFSC intend to be more sustainable within the office, as well as during events.

The IFSC Sustainability Guidelines and goals for 2020-2022 follow the International Olympice Committee's five focus areas

The first four are applicable to things that the sports industry does, such as building/operating venues, acquiring goods/services and managing resources, moving people/goods, as well as managing people. Climate, the fifth focus area, requires special attention as a recurring theme.

To be committed to sustainability means to take the time to consider new an improved ways of thinking and behaving, challenging and learning from old ways of doint things so as to change for the better. As new issues surrounding sustainability are constantly arising, we invite our stakeholders to offer feedback and suggestions to ensure that the IFSC Sustainability Guidelines are as up-to-date and accurate as possible.

Climate ActionGender EqualityGood HealthResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

Games Time: Planning and Acting to Respect Human Rights in Mega-Sporting Events

Centre for Sport and Human Rights and Ergon Associates

Games Time is designed to support organisations and authorities involved in the final preparation and delivery of major sporting events in their efforts to ensure respect for international human rights standards. In the overall lifecycle of a major sporting event, the final six months (‘games time’) are critical not only to delivery of the event, but also to ensuring human rights are protected. This Guide helps organisers do this important work.

It will help those seeking to understand how to identify possible human rights risks beforehand, and assess any actual or potential adverse human rights impacts with which they may be involved. Risks and impacts are likely to be different depending on whether the event involves single or multiple days, single or multiple sports, or single or multiple venues (or cities). The risk will also vary where the venues or cities have hosted previous games or competitions of a similar scale and nature.

All too often, human rights analyses focus on risks and negative impacts without considering human rights opportunities and the potential for positive impact or legacy. Beyond discussions of risk and mitigation, this Guidance also seeks to explore opportunities for legacy, influence and lasting impact.

Download the Guide below now in either full or low resolution (best for sharing via email).

Games Time: Planning and Acting to Respect Human Rights in Mega-Sporting Events

(Low Resolution) Games Time: Planning and Acting to Respect Human Rights in Mega-Sporting Events

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

F1 Sustainability Strategy

International Automobile Federation

In launching F1s first-ever sustainability strategy, with an ambitious target
to be a net zero carbon sport by 2030, we recognise the critical role that all
organisations must play in tackling this global issue.


Leveraging the immense talent, passion and drive for innovation held by all
members of the F1 community, we hope to make a significant positive
impact on the environment and communities in which we operate.

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

Checklist for Organizers of UWW sanctioned Events

United World Wrestling

This checklist may be used by Organizers to plan, manage and deliver the Event in a way which enhances environmental, social and economic opportunities and minimizes adverse impacts, as described in UWW's Event Preparation Guide (Section 10). 

Climate ActionLife on LandPartnerships for the Goals
Guidelines and reports

Sustainability handbook for Event Organisers

FEI

The concept of our FEI Sustainability Programme was born of the desire to make a serious contribnution towards conserving the sound environment necessary for the practice and continuity of equestrian sport. Being an International Federation revolving around horses, it goes without saying thatr it is in our best interest to encourage and help develop an increasingly sustainable environment at equestrian events.

This handbook aims to encourage event organisers to implement verious sustainability initiatives that will help reduce negative environmental impact and create a positive legacy

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

Game Changer – How climate change is impacting sports in the UK

Game changer

This report aims to raise awareness of climate change and all it threatens, and encourage people to show their support for action to address it.

Climate ActionLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

FIA Environmental Accreditation Programme Guidelines

International Automobile Federation

The FIA Environmental Accreditation Programme is aimed at helping motor sport and mobility stakeholders worldwide to measure and enhance their environmental performance. By introducing a clear and consistent environmental management system, it provides stakeholders with a three-level framework against which to accredit their activities.
It is organised around three levels:

  1. One-Star – Basic practice: Demonstrate basic environmental performance and a commitment to improve
  2. Two-Star – Good practice: Demonstrate good environmental performance and be close to follow internationally developed roadmaps toward environmental management
  3. Three-Star – Best practice: Demonstrate best practice and commitment to seek continual improvement through the implementation of an environmental management system
    For any questions, please contact the FIA Sustainability team at afe@fia.com

PROCESS
It is recommended that FIA stakeholders wishing to obtain the accreditation start by filling in the Initial Evaluation Form, allowing the FIA Sustainability team to evaluate the current environmental performance and advise on next steps.
Following a first meeting with the FIA Sustainability team, the FIA Environmental Accreditation programme: Self-Assessment Tool should be used in support to these guidelines in order to implement the different recommendations and achieve the targeted level of accreditation.

Once the organisation is ready to be audited, the Formal Application Form should be completed and returned to afe@fia.com for review. A remote (One-Star, Two-Star) or on-site (Three-Star) audit will then be planned in order to finalise the accreditation process.
Following the audit process, an official certificate will be issued, including potential key recommendations for improvement and next audit date.

Climate ActionLife on LandResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Climate Change and The Olympic Winter Games

International Academy of Sport Science and Technology (AISTS)

The Olympic Winter Games have been held every four years since 1924, with the most recent edition taking place in PyeongChang, South Korea in February 2018. In recent years, we have witnessed a drastic effect on winter sports resulting in delays, cancellations and venue changes due to weather inconsistency.

This project focuses on the impacts and risks of climate change and explores its potential effects on winter sports in the future, specifically on the Olympic programme. Outlined below were the objectives for the research involved.

Climate ActionInnovation and Infrastructure
Guidelines and reports

Sport, Broadcasting and Human Rights – Guiding Questions

Mega Sporting Event Platform

All companies have a responsibility to respect human rights when they carry out their business. The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights guide companies in how to meet their responsibilities, and due diligence is a critical component.

This tool, "Sport, Broadcasting and Human Rights - Guiding Questions", is intended to help broadcasters identify and, if necessary, mitigate any potential human rights impacts that may occur when broadcasting a sporting event. It builds on the White Paper "Broadcasters and Human Rights in the Sports Context", which identified potential risks to people and their rights arising from broadcasting a sporting event. 

This tool can be used alongside existing planning and risk processes, such as health and safety assessments, and is intended to be practical, flexible, and to help identify ways to address the particular risks identified.

Download the tool here

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Sport Sustainability Introduction : What is sustainability ?

Borussia Dortmund Football Club

What makes sports events sustainable. This module is part of a 12 clips guide created by SportAccord, AISTS, PI, and IOC, to help us understand sustainability as a whole, and look at what it means. It looks at the risks and opportunites, the business case of sustainable sports events. It introduces the benefits, ISO 20121 management system, reporting and impact assessment. (Video 1/12)

Affordable and Clean EnergyClean Water and SanitationClimate ActionDecent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityGood HealthInnovation and InfrastructureLife Below WaterLife on LandNo HungerNo PovertyQuality EducationReduced InequalitiesResponsible ConsumptionSustainable Cities and Communities
Guidelines and reports

2018 carbon footprint calculation

Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA)

This report outlines the ongoing results of monitoring and reporting of the UIAA's carbon footprint, which is in response to our signed commitment in early 2019 and participation under the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Sports for Climate Action.

Affordable and Clean EnergyClimate ActionResponsible Consumption
Guidelines and reports

Sport, Sponsorship and Human Rights – Guiding Questions

Mega Sporting Event Platform

Sponsors have a responsibility, within their own operations and throughout their supply chains, to respect human rights. Sporting events are no different from any other business relationship in terms of needing to proactively take account of potential human rights risks.

'Sport, Sponsorship and Human Rights - Guiding Questions' is a tool intended to prompt the identification of issues to consider at the earliest stages of developing a sport sponsorship relationship, and in the sponsor agreement itself. Building on the white paper on ‘Sponsors and Human Rights in the Sports Context’, these questions should help sponsors consider how they might create effective leverage to address human rights risks throughout the lifetime of the sponsorship.

Download the Sport, Sponsorhip and Human Rights Guiding questions

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

Carbon Management and Climate protection at FIFA

FIFA

As an international organisation, FIFA takes its responsibility to protect, cherish and limit its impact on the environment seriously. FIFA aims to lead by example and inspire greater awareness and best practices in sustainability standards with regard to FIFA World Cups™ and within FIFA as an organisation. That is why, since the 2006 FIFA World Cup Germany™, it has been continuously implementing environmental projects and engaging with its stakeholders and other institutions to find sensible ways of addressing environmental issues, mitigate the negative environmental impact of its activities and increase its activities that have a positive impact on the environment.

Climate Action
Guidelines and reports

Championing Human Rights in the Governance of Sports Bodies

Mega Sporting Events Platform

Sports bodies are critical actors in delivering mega-sporting events, setting the expectations and standards to which events should be delivered. Through implementing human rights within their own governance and operations, sports bodies can take important steps towards protecting the values of sport and implementing respect for human rights.

A human rights guide for sports bodies of all sizes was launched at the General Assembly of the Commonwealth Games Federation (CGF), on the eve of the 2018 Commonwealth Games in Gold Coast, Australia.

"Championing Human Rights in the Governance of Sports Bodies" introduces human rights to sports bodies, large and small, drawing on lessons from the International Olympic Committee, FIFA, UEFA, and the Commonwealth Games Federation and outlining four tangible steps that sports bodies can take to build human rights into the governance of their organisations. Focussed explicitly on governance, this Guide is intended for consideration at executive and board level of sports bodies.

This guide introduces human rights to sports bodies, large and small, drawing on lessons from the International Olympic Committee, FIFA, UEFA, and the Commonwealth Games Federation and outlining four tangible steps that sports bodies can take to build human rights into the governance of their organisations. Focussed explicitly on governance, this Guide is intended for consideration at executive and board level of sports bodies.
The four steps are as follow :

  1. Commit and Embed : make public commitment to respect human rights and ensure this is embedded within standards and practices
  2. Identify risks : identify any actual and potential risks and prioritise for action those that are most salient (or severe)
  3. Take action : Take appropriate action to address risks to human rights and provide access to remedy when necessary
  4. Communicate : Report and communicate how the organisation is addressing risks to human rights

Download the English version of the guide

Download the French version of the guide

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Corruption and Human Rights in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

This White Paper gives an overview on the most frequent corruption risks linked to mega-sporting events (MSEs), including:

  • Corruption within bidding processes
  • Corruption in contracting
  • Corruption undermining due diligence and regulations.

Over the last three decades as MSEs have become a more and more a sought after instrument by which to demonstrate a country’s economic and political strength, its ability to organise big events, and its status in the international community, the risk of corrupt practices to win bids to host these events has increased enormously.

As a bidding city and the respective country have to invest a huge amount of money and prestige in order to stage an MSE, the pressure to succeed is high and may increase the risk of achieving the goal - not just by fair lobbying.

Peace and Justice
Guidelines and reports

White Papers – Broadcasters and Human Rights in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

Broadcasting plays an important role in MSEs. It is the conduit by which a global audience accesses such events. Opinions differ on the role broadcasters should take when faced with broadcasting events which take place in challenging human rights contexts. Some argue that broadcasters should use this role to raise awareness of human rights issues in the host country. Others say that broadcasting the events is a tacit endorsement of local Governments whose policies may have an adverse impact on local communities. There is also a view that broadcasting MSEs allows local athletes to reach a global audience and exercise their human right to sporting activity.


This is a difficult balancing act. Aside from this broader question of whether to broadcast MSEs, there are also human rights considerations while broadcasting live events, such as ensuring freedom of expression, not propagating discrimination, protecting the right to privacy and avoiding self-censorship. These decisions have to be made on-the-spot, often in the context of regulatory requirements for impartiality, and with the potential for third party complaints.
Furthermore, broadcasters often do not have control over the material they broadcast.
There are different types of broadcasting models, ranging from sole editorial control over material, through to broadcasting clips from other broadcasters which may be based in different countries.
Broadcasters also do not control how a MSE is run, particularly as they only tend to become involved once a MSE has been awarded to a host city or country.


Sports governing bodies and the hosts have the greatest influence over the event.
Broadcasters therefore welcome the fact that sports governing bodies are increasingly looking to incorporate respect for human rights into their governance values and hosting requirements. This represents an opportunity, in turn, to embed human rights considerations into the fabric of an MSE. This approach can then be flowed down to corporates such as broadcasters, who can introduce ancillary human rights protections through their own operations.

Nevertheless, whilst a broadcaster’s role in a MSE is of a more supporting nature, their commercial significance to the MSE business model should still be recognised.
Broadcast licence fees are a major source of income for sports governing bodies.

Broadcasters should anticipate increasing scrutiny about their role in MSEs.
With reference to the UN Guiding Principles for Business and Human Rights (UNGPs), this White Paper therefore explains the relationship between broadcasters and MSEs, identifies where human rights issues might arise, and discusses potential mechanisms which could be used – and in some cases already are being used – to address them.

Reflecting its contributors’ businesses, this discussion has an emphasis on the UK and European markets. It is intended that these examples can be supplemented by examples from the wider global market in subsequent discussions.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Remedy Mechanisms for Human Rights in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

Access to remedy is one of the three pillars of UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UN Guiding Principles). It is also a key component of the mandate of National Contact Points (NCP) for the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises and National Human Rights Institutions (OECD Guidelines). In the context of international sport, specific dispute resolution mechanisms exist. In some cases, they address human rights issues such as the right to a fair trial. However, they have not been designed to address all the human rights-related issues that may arise from Mega Sporting Events (MSE), be it human rights issues within sports events themselves, or human rights impacts related to the organisation and holding of sports events. On the other hand, a range of other mechanisms exist which complement sports-related ones, including judicial mechanisms, such as national courts and tribunals, as well as a range of non-judicial mechanisms.


This paper maps out various means of access to remedy in a sport-related context, including mechanisms within selected sports bodies and institutions, and identifies current gaps in dealing with human rights-related issues, as well as judicial and nonjudicial mechanisms that may be used to deal with human rights issues. For each mechanism, the strengths and challenges in dealing with human rights-related issues are briefly indicated. The paper then identifies the gaps in access to remedy, suggests how they might be filled and provides recommendations on the role that a mega sporting events centre or mechanism (MSE Centre) might play in providing guidance on existing mechanisms, in addressing gaps and in providing access to a remedy for the victims of human rights abuse in connection with a MSE.


Three major gaps have been identified:
• There is presently an absence of a binding and standing human rights policy and capacity across international sport within major international sports organisations
(ISOs) and, as a consequence, no recourse to dispute resolution through such channels can be had for cases related to human rights
• Notwithstanding the capacity of ISOs to protect, promote and enforce human rights through a sports-based grievance mechanism, such a mechanism has not been created
• There is a lack of recognition and promotion by ISOs of external dispute resolution mechanisms. All mechanisms for remedy need to be promoted and accessible in the event that more consensual mechanisms fail. As this paper identifies, in addition to sports specific mechanisms, a range of other mechanisms exist, which, if functioning well, could provide access to remedy in a range of situations

Gender EqualityPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Human Rights Risk Mitigation in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

Despite commitments from a number of the leading sports governing bodies to include human rights in future bidding processes for events, there is presently no mega-sporting event (MSE) in the pipeline that was awarded hosting status premised on explicit human rights commitments, beyond limited criteria touching on labour standards in the supply chain and broader questions of non-discrimination. The timescale for putting such measures is evolving, but even if and when human rights measures are in place, not all adverse impacts caused by the lifecycle of developing and delivering an event will be preventable. Where there is potential for harm to occur, stakeholders must identify, mitigate and remediate those impacts, as outlined in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and related international standards.
Mitigating human rights risks means identifying salient human rights impacts and taking steps to reduce the adverse effects of those impacts. While the range of human rights risks associated with delivering a major event is broad, the MSE Platform Steering Committee has identified (a) forced labour and human trafficking and (b) security and policing as areas of high priority for stakeholders, and pertinent risks in the context of currently awarded events.

Accordingly, this paper is divided into two sections, first focusing on human trafficking and forced labour, and second on security and policing
Several of the issues raised are expanded upon in the appendices and annexes.


The various sections of this paper draw a number of conclusions and propose a series of recommendations, especially with regard to the potential function of an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthPeace and JusticeReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Procurement and Human Rights in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

This White Paper examines the human rights roles and responsibilities of host governments, organising committees and delivery partners, with respect to risk mitigation and remedy. Within this broad framework, authors were asked to specifically identify better ways to integrate human rights due diligence into procurement practices for mega-sporting events (MSEs).


This White Paper seeks to address this task by considering:
• The likely range of procurement activities across the MSE life-cycle and diversity of suppliers, including SMEs, as well as assessing the potential for leverage with suppliers and construction companies.
• Emerging good practice and the extent to which lessons have been learnt and/or could be transferable across events and between sporting traditions.
• Existing tools / models for improving human rights good practice and responsible business conduct that can be tailored to MSE delivery needs and different geographies.
• The need for leadership by sports governing bodies (SGB) to ensure leverage with suppliers over the long term.
• The scope for, and potential merits of, approved supplier lists.
• The linkage with and implications of human rights due diligence requirements being built into SGB tendering documents.

The White Paper concludes that human rights due diligence has a role to play in the commissioning and management of suppliers, contractors and other providers essential for the delivery of mega sporting events. It highlights a number of good practice examples, many of which have been shared and replicated by host organisations across MSEs. The adoption of a standard sourcing code (such as ETI’s Base Code, or WFGSI’s Model Code) against which to measure supplier performance is a good example of this. The application and effectiveness of supporting monitoring processes and grievance mechanisms, however, show a mixed picture of performance, especially in terms of satisfying broader stakeholder concerns. And although the embedding of human rights due diligence requirements into formal tendering procedures for events is being advanced, for example by FIFA, it has yet to become a reality.

It identifies six areas where an independent centre / entity could potentially assist organisers and sporting bodies, by:

  1. Capturing, recording and sharing best practices across the sporting organisations and governments that play host to MSEs, or desire to bid for MSEs.
  2. Developing an operational blue print, offering clarity about the respective roles and responsibilities of the organisations involved in the procurement of goods and services for an MSE, and the due diligence processes, remedies and complaint mechanisms needed to protect rights at each stage in the MSE lifecycle.
  3. Analysing and promoting applicable international standards, or acting as a standard-setter in its own right, to help drive greater consistency and better outcomes for stakeholders around MSEs.
  4. Design of effective human rights based operational grievance mechanism for construction activities that address community concerns during land acquisition, as well as in the subsequent construction and operational stages of new venues or facilities. There are already tools and guidance available for large scale development projects that could be modified for this purpose.
  5. Where appropriate, facilitating in the appointment of independent Ombudsmen or advisors to support grievance processes.
  6. Developing annual indices to benchmark the adoption of human rights due diligence approaches and the reported performance of vendors and their suppliers in the lead-up to an event.

In seeking to promote the use of human rights due diligence in relation to MSE procurement, the paper also concludes that is important to define where the respective responsibilities lie between host governments, organising committees, and the SGB. Ideally for local communities, accountability must reside with the organising committee delivering the event, and the government backing it. Ultimately it is the organising committee that locally awards, and thereafter manages, the procurement contracts and service agreements that are essential for a successful event. In contrast, SGBs are best placed to act as enablers, encouraging the responsible behaviour of host governments and embedding human rights due diligence requirements into the contract terms for each event, and thereafter providing high-level oversight to track their on-the-ground delivery.


An independent centre / entity could play a very different role in each of these areas.

Subject of course to the willingness and interest of the respective SGB, and the MSE host organisation, to tap into the available expertise and knowledge held by a centre / entity.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthPeace and JusticeReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Athletes’ Rights and Mega-Sporting Events

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

This paper maps the conduct of MSEs and their impact on athletes by reference to international human rights standards. Necessarily, this paper does so by examining the regulatory control exercised by ISOs, which perform the dual role of governing MSEs as well as governing and regulating the conduct of sport.

This paper then identifies any gap in ensuring that the human rights of athletes are protected, respected and remedied. Finally, this paper suggests how those gaps may be filled and provides recommendations on the role that a Mega-Sporting Events Centre (MSE Centre) might play in addressing them.


Four major gaps are identified:
• There is presently an absence of a binding and standing human rights policy and capacity across professional sport within major ISOs and MSEs that deals with the human rights of athletes.
• A human rights due diligence process is often absent from the governance, regulation and conduct of ISOs and MSEs in relation to the athletes who participate in a MSE, and whose work, careers and livelihoods as athletes are often dependent or greatly affected by that participation.
• Social dialogue and collective bargaining are not widespread, and are commonly and actively discouraged by ISOs even in relation to athletes who are organised into legitimate trade unions and athlete and player associations. Where social dialogue and collective bargaining occurs, however, the outcomes for both the athletes and their sports have been overwhelmingly positive. Where barriers exist to the establishment of social dialogue and collective bargaining, such as in relation to child athletes, there is commonly an absence of structured dialogue with their legitimate representatives.
• Notwithstanding the substantial legal capacity of ISOs to protect, promote and enforce the human rights of athletes through a sports based grievance mechanism, such a mechanism has not been created in connection with MSEs. As a consequence, no recourse to dispute resolution can be had for cases related to human rights.


This leaves athletes with access to judicial remedies (where available) in order to have their human rights upheld, a path prohibited either by sporting regulation or precluded by the time sensitive nature of sport.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthPeace and JusticeReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Sports Governing Bodies and Human Rights Due Diligence

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

The sports governing bodies (referred to in this report as awarding bodies) espouse high ideals like harmony among nations, humanity, dignity, solidarity, fair-play, and sustainability. They rightly place great emphasis on sport as a driver for peace and development. Less consideration has been given to date to the responsibility these bodies share with others to both understand and address the negative impacts MSEs can have on people.
The UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights (UN Guiding Principles) affirm the obligations of governments to protect against rights abuses involving nonstate actors, and set out the responsibilities of enterprises to respect human rights.
They offer an invaluable roadmap for many businesses active in the MSE space, and for the awarding bodies themselves, who set the terms and criteria upon which these events are run. The concept of human rights due diligence underpins efforts by enterprises to avoid causing harm to people – the workers, communities, athletes, fans, and spectators upon which MSEs rely. But what does that mean in practice? How should awarding bodies go about identifying, preventing, mitigating, and accounting for how adverse human rights impact are addressed, or where necessary remedied, in an MSE context?

This White Paper explores how the provisions laid out in the UN Guiding Principles relate to awarding bodies - drawing on respected sources like the report “For the Game, For the World” prepared by Prof. John Ruggie. It additionally starts to pinpoint some of the areas that may need to be prioritised in order to demonstrate respect for human rights, including around the integration of human rights considerations into the bidding requirements for MSEs.

This White Paper starts to review initiatives by awarding bodies to meet the responsibility to respect human rights. it presents a snapshot rather than an exhaustive analysis, with the examples offered illustrating the kind of work currently being undertaken within sport or on the horizon. The authors welcome and encourage updates and fresh insights from each of the awarding bodies identified, as well as any other international sports federations not yet captured within this report, in order to benchmark the progress being made within the sports sector to advance respect for human rights within an MSE context.


Sport is at the start of a new journey on human rights issues. Like others in business before them, there is an opportunity for the sports sector to learn from ongoing efforts within the wider business community, as well as to take advantage of expertise and insights offered from civil society, trade unions, governments, intergovernmental bodies and other human rights experts. Collective action approaches may offer one avenue for advancing this work going forward.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthGood HealthQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Evaluating Human Rights Risks in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

The purpose of this White Paper is to analyse data from UN and ILO public sources on human rights and labour standards and assess the extent to which these sources can serve as a basis for preparing “country human rights briefs” on mega-sporting event candidate and host cities/countries. These sources, endorsed by the vast majority of countries, are envisaged as a credible starting point for assessing levels of human rights risks in a country context.
Four countries were selected from the mega-sporting event context in order to gauge whether the research and methodology proposed for this study holds up in practice.
The countries chosen are the four next hosts for the Commonwealth Games (Gold Coast 2018, Australia, and Durban 2022, South Africa) and Commonwealth Youth Games (Nassau 2017, The Bahamas, and Belfast 2021, Northern Ireland). These were chosen because the selection process for these events has already been finalized and because they provide good geographic spread.
We have reviewed a defined list of International Labour Organization (“ILO”) and United Nations Human Rights Council sources (“UN sources”), referred to jointly as “primary sources”.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthPeace and JusticeQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Children’s Rights in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

This White Paper examines the manifold risks of mega-sporting events (MSEs) to children.
It reviews the impact that MSEs can have on the development and the rights of children in the country or city where an MSE is taking place, as well as the impact on children
affected as athletes, through the supply of goods and services for the event, or through the marketing and advertising of products during the event and its broadcast.
It highlights some encouraging practice which has emerged in relation to MSEs and children, whilst recognising that the process of considering child specific measures
and policies in the frame of MSEs is still in its infancy.
It proposes that, since children are more vulnerable than adults and need specific support to guarantee that their rights are upheld, MSE awarding bodies should adopt
an explicit child rights focus to ensure the right action is taken to address the potential impact that these events can have on children.
Awareness about the specific rights and needs of children and the existence of potential negative impacts is the starting point for action. This requires the capacity of
governing bodies and other stakeholders related to MSEs to be increased. This White Paper gives some insight and suggestions for how this could be achieved, as well as
suggestions for the processes which will need to be in place for future events.
It concludes by reflecting on the role that an independent ‘centre’ could play in making MSEs a place where children’s rights are respected and protected, highlighting potential
roles in relation to knowledge sharing, service provision and monitoring capacities. It proposes that these mechanisms should be easily adaptable to local needs and focused
on generating rapid progress for the child-sensitive organisation of MSEs.

Decent Work and Economic GrowthQuality EducationReduced Inequalities
Guidelines and reports

White Paper – Sponsors and Human Rights in the Sports Context

Mega Sporting Events

A total of 11 White Papers have been produced, clustered into four themes referring to key stakeholder groups. These White Papers aim to present the latest thinking, practice, and debate in relation to key human rights issues involved in the planning, construction, delivery, and legacy of MSEs. Each paper also considers the case for, and potential role of, an independent centre of expertise on MSEs and human rights.

Human rights groups have for some years lobbied sponsors to bring about human rights improvements in the context of mega-sporting events (MSE) – from Beijing and London, through to Sochi and Rio. This is based in part on a belief that their investment in the process puts them in a position to exert significant influence and leverage over host governments, sports governing bodies (SGB), and others involved in the planning and staging of an MSE.

This White Paper explores the state of human rights as it relates to the sponsor-MSE relationship. It considers the history, models and mechanics of MSE sponsorship first, before reviewing the human rights risks traditionally posed by or involving MSE sponsors.


At the local event level, local sponsors may in some instances be vetted by SGB’s locallevel entities (for example, local organising committees, national Olympic committees).
On the other hand, international sponsors are not typically subject to due diligence by local SBG entities, as their partnership deals are agreed at the international level with the SGB directly.


At the international sponsor level, while the process of SGB due diligence on sponsors is not entirely new, it is unclear what due diligence SGBs carry out to ensure their standards are met, how they determine what is deemed to conflict with their values, and whether human rights considerations are taken into account. It would be noteworthy if a SGB undertook explicit human rights due diligence on sponsors beyond the area of products/goods suppliers and license holders. Given global sponsors are not procured through open tenders (instead, typically through bilateral negotiation), greater transparency is needed to ensure that adequate human rights vetting does occur in the future and where appropriate that it is aligned with the due diligence undertaken for local sponsors.


On the flip side, while the majority of global Olympic and FIFA sponsors already have a human rights policy that explicitly commits to respecting human rights, the process of implementing these commitments in the MSE context through systematic human rights due diligence on the SGB is less common.


Sponsors report that their due diligence in an MSE context occurs more often at the local level, when local business units need to understand the associated risks and mitigations of upcoming events. However, the reality is that by this time the event has already been awarded, their due diligence plays no role in influencing the decision of where to host or any aspect of the conditions, including on human rights terms, between sports bodies and the LOC/NOC.


Sponsors maintain they hold the greatest leverage over the activities of the SGB/MSE (the rights holders) at the point of negotiation, before the sponsor relationship has been formalised. Once signed, sponsors indicate they have far less scope to make new demands or raise new expectations. This is largely due to the fact that they are dealing with a monopolistic rights seller, and competing with a range of other potential sponsors. Tied to this, sponsors indicated this leverage does not extend itself to influence over the host city; sponsors’ leverage is primarily with the rights holder alone, which is one step removed from the host entity.


In using their influence and leverage, it is clear that rather than publicly intervene in an alleged human rights issue related to an MSE (but not necessarily related to the sponsor’s products, operations or activities), sponsors prefer to act ‘behind the scenes’.


This typically takes the form of serving as sounding boards for dilemma situations and providing insights and guidance to SGB, LOCs, NOCs, and others involved in MSE delivery. Similarly, rather than developing extensive networks with the government, NGOs, and others locally, sponsors have generally sought to develop the capacity of the NOC or LOC to do this.
Some sponsors believe there is much more that SGBs can and should do ‘upstream’ to ensure that human rights is an integral part of the tendering, sport-listing, and awarding process – so that commitments are made by host governments/cities and LOCs from the start. This creates a business case for sponsors to concentrate their human rights due diligence and leverage efforts during the negotiation phase, and upon the pre-bid, bidding, short-listing and awarding processes. There is a clear hope by sponsors that SGBs will introduce human rights fully into future bidding processes, a clear area where sponsors can already begin to exert their influence. Once introduced, such commitments also create fertile ground for leveraging progress on practical implementation.


In addition, in recent years the nature of sponsorship has been changing: relationships between sponsors and SGB are becoming longer and more bespoke to specific product categories; some of the traditional boundaries between sponsorship, advertising, and broadcasting are breaking down with the on-line marketing sphere becoming increasingly dominant; and as MSEs become more and more global so too will sponsorship portfolios. How these developments may influence the nature of sponsor leverage over the human rights impacts of an MSE must be closely watched and anticipated.
To date, and in the path of the high expectations placed upon them by campaigners and the media, individual sponsors have tended to act alone on human rights in the MSE context. Yet given the apparent low state of sponsor leverage and existing due diligence over human rights issues in the MSE context, sponsors have struggled to protect the reputation of the franchise when faced with social risks over which they have little or no direct control.


This creates a case and opportunity for greater collective action between sponsors in order to build leverage, and also to work with other stakeholders to embed human rights into the DNA of the sponsor relationship. Multi-stakeholder approaches can help develop consensus around a number of pressing questions for sponsors in relation to MSEs and human rights, including: determining the most salient human rights issues within the MSE context, as well as rubric for determining their level of involvement in potential impacts; how to best prioritise their due diligence efforts; and, the appropriate role of an MSE sponsor in providing access to effective remedies, amongst others.
The sponsors that participated in interviews for this white paper all believe that this might be best facilitated through a new, independent, and permanent centre, platform, or mechanism that can establish multi-stakeholder trust and maintain focus over the years of implementation ahead.

This paper focuses mainly on IOC and FIFA sponsor relationships, although it is recognised that sponsorship is also a significant driver for other international events (such as tennis, Formula One, rugby, and cricket, amongst others) and in professional sport at the national level (e.g. baseball, football, basketball or ice hockey in the context of North America).
Four major international sponsors provided input for this paper. In addition, reviews of the limited number of written sources on the sponsor-MSE-human rights relationship have been reviewed and reflected. As such, this paper cannot be considered to be representative of all MSE sponsor views globally.

Guidelines and reports

2018 FIFA World Cup™ Greenhouse gas accounting report

FIFA


The FIFA World Cup™ is an international football competition for the senior men’s national teams of FIFA’s member associations that takes place every four years. Its popularity is truly global, bringing excitement to communities around the world and uniting people from different backgrounds through the common language of football. The next FIFA World Cup will take place in the Russian Federation from 14 June to 15 July 2018.

Staging the tournament entails transporting millions of people to the matches and fan fests, ensuring their health and safety, dealing with waste in the stadiums, recruiting and training thousands of volunteers, providing an event that is accessible for everyone and broadcasting the matches in over 200 countries.
This scale inevitably has an impact on society, the environment and the climate.


As the organisers of this mega-event, FIFA and the Local Organising Committee are committed to protecting and conserving the environment. One important part of understanding the environmental impact is to understand the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions caused by the preparation and staging of the competition. For this purpose, FIFA and the LOC teamed up with experts to estimate the projected GHG emissions resulting from the 2018 FIFA World Cup in Russia.


The GHG accounting and reporting procedure used for this report is based on the Greenhouse Gas Protocol, the most widely used international accounting tool for government and business leaders to understand, quantify and manage greenhouse gas emissions.

Climate ActionLife on Land
Guidelines and reports

FIS Green Event Manual

International Ski Federation

A "Green Event" is defined as an environmentally sound and sustainable implementation of events. Energy efficiency, waste management, local economy, and social responsibility are among the central issues. Small and large events can contribute significantly contribute to environmental protection. Public and media events play a big role in the education process because they draw the interest of a large number of people to actively participate in environmental protection.

Climate ActionLife on LandPartnerships for the GoalsQuality EducationResponsible Consumption